ABSTRACT STREAMS:

Responsible Collaborative

Call for Abstracts

Transforming Global Health

For the fourth year running, we are delighted to invite health partnerships, institutions, organisations, private companies, within and across sector, interested in sharing their evidence of success, challenges and lessons learnt under the below key themes to submit abstracts to THET. 

Selected partners will be invited to present their findings in the form of oral presentations or poster displays at the conference. This is an opportunity to showcase their work to a wide audience of global health professionals across different sectors, including health service delivery, academia and research, professional bodies, companies and not for profits, and make meaningful connections for stronger collaboration.

We are also pleased to be able to offer travel bursaries for this year’s conference to up to six successful abstract submissions to nationals of a low or middle income country. Following selection the THET team will be in touch to detail this further with eligible presenters.

We ask for relevant abstracts to be submitted under one of the following categories:

Equity in an era of universal health coverage: ensuring the right to healthcare.

How is the global health community coming together to address these questions. What are the initiatives working to challenge stigmas and the partnerships advocating for those held in the waiting rooms?

We welcome submissions that address one or several of these points:

-Ethics of healthcare provision and service
-Exploring stigma and the ways in which communities are tackling this
-Denial of treatment or corruption
-Medical detention
-Healthcare as a human right

You should present verifiable qualitative and/or quantitative evidence that the change to which your work contributed has or has not furthered the human right to healthcare. Presentations can focus on any health theme or area. Discussions of the challenges of ensuring health is a human right are also welcomed.

Are we leaving or pushing people behind?

Universal Health Coverage is explicit in its definition, and yet all around the world there are people being left behind. Whilst the provision of healthcare is crucial, we must acknowledge the factors; economic, social, political, etc. that affect the development of poor health and illnesses. From religious objections to unsafe workplaces, and from discrimination towards LGBTQ communities to the spread of high sugar diets, these sessions will look at the role we are playing in ‘pushing’ people behind in the progression towards UHC?

How is the global health community advocating for change and shouting for those with the quietest voices? We would like to hear from champions working to pull these groups into UHC considerations and ensure they will not be left behind.

We welcome submissions that address one or several of these points:
-Responding to an essential need/gap in health services in a low and middle income country (LMIC)
-Ensuring that health services are accessible to all communities
-Targeting particularly vulnerable groups including women, girls and people with disabilities in a LMIC
-Working within the health system to provide a basic health coverage package or expand the health coverage available to communities
-Ensuring equal participation and collaboration within the health workforce and in access to training (e.g. women and men, people with disabilities, people from different ethnic groups)
-Providing equal opportunities for collaboration within a health partnership – including with regards to volunteer engagement (e.g. women and men, people with disabilities, people from different ethnic groups).

You should present verifiable qualitative and/or quantitative evidence that the change to which your work contributed has or has not been accessible to different social groups. Presentations can focus on any health theme or area.

In most of the contexts where partnerships work, a range of national and international organisations are involved to contribute in one way or another to strengthen the health system.
How well are partnerships identifying and linking with others working in similar fields? What are the benefits, challenges and examples of how these have been overcome?

We welcome submissions that consider the points above and provide insight into one or several of the points below:

-Working within networks
-Understanding national contexts
-Developing a common understanding
-Managing diverse organisational cultures

You should present verifiable qualitative and/or quantitative evidence of your learning and experience and include conclusions and recommendations for future collaborative work.

Can collaboration with other disciplines beyond healthcare bring a richer interpretation of a problem or a potential solution, or does it reduce focus and clarity?

Bringing about change in complex and sometimes unfamiliar contexts requires deep understanding of that context and how change happens within it. By working with specialists from other disciplines, health programmes can gain invaluable insight into how best to promote long-term sustainable change.

We welcome submissions that capture the experience of working with other disciplines, the benefits, challenges and lessons and provide insight into one or more of the following:

-Reaching a common language
-Hierarchies of knowledge
-New insights

You should present verifiable qualitative and/or quantitative evidence of your learning and experience and include conclusions and recommendations for future collaborative work.